March 2014 | ExpedEvac
As we travel, there are many means of transport available to get from A to B. Some are certainly more hairy than others! Then there are some that we can just get "tasters" of i.e. using the the particular mode of transport only in a specified area like a safari on horse or elephant.

Through my travels I managed to accumulate some interesting shots of the different modes of transport, including local modes of transport as well as those that transport local produce or other commercial loads.

Let me know what transport you've used that was a bit hairy and/or different. Enjoy!


By elephant in Khao Sok, Thailand
The documents required for vehicles throughout Africa vary although there are a few basics that remain fairly consistent for most of the continent. Remember that some of the documents required by police and/or border officials are also sometimes subject to their own personal interpretations, whims and moods (maybe even as to how much a particular matter, or person may yield in "fees").  As I mentioned on my other posts about documents, make sure you have a good number of copies, with at least a few sets certified and then scans e-mailed to your own e-mail address. Please contact me if you need a more detailed breakdown and planning for your specific vehicle.

Now we have the personal contact sheet, what's the next batch of documents we need for a trip? Keep in mind that these tips relating to documents are generally in respect of a multi-country trip but is just as applicable for a visit to just one country. The copies of the documents below should be made into batches and then spread the batches around your bags, one batch in each bag at least including carry-on luggage and then one that is always at hand. It would be worth scanning (with a smartphone will do) all the documents and e-mailing one set to your e-mail address
Crossing Africa by whatever means has been the attraction for many an explorer and intrepid traveller. The "Dark Continent", as it is still referred to by those who have not experienced the delights, spills and drama Africa provides, can be very much in your face. Most will either fall in love with it or just hate it straight out with the minority of travellers falling into the latter category. My saying has always been "...the only constant in Africa is that nothing is constant!"

Central Cameroon south of Ngaoundere
Eating on the road in Africa has always been an enriching experience and hugely appetising I may add! In this photo the meat (beef in this case) has been chopped into smaller pieces and barbeque'd on coals. Onion gets sliced up and added afterward as well as some spicy spices if you want, otherwise, just salt. The mixture is shaken up in the brown paper before being wrapped up tighter for you. The price - well, the princely sum of US$0.40! Delicious and filling!!
Sunset in on the Niger River in Segou, Mali
This is a little intro to my travels in and through the amazing African continent. A large percentage of it has been with my faithful 4x4 or an overland truck of some description. At times I've had to fly between countries but that's not necessarily the memorable part although the arrivals and departures are hardly ever boring!

To date I've worked and travelled through 30 countries in Africa with various countries being a semi-stable base for a short time at some stage. Rwanda was my base for 5 years although even then I was travelling a lot by road and also flying off to visit countries outside of Africa.

In 2011 I did a solo expedition with a 2-wheel drive 8ton Mercedes truck through West Africa from Zimbabwe to Bamako, the capital of Mali.